Find Us On

   



 

Search
 Diabetes
Diabetes is a group of diseases characterized by high levels of blood sugar, resulting from insufficient production of insulin by the pancreas and is the leading cause of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) in the United States. Research suggests that by controlling high blood pressure, monitoring blood sugar levels and the reduction of dietary protein intake can actually slow down the progression of CKD.
 
10 Facts about Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease:
  1. Nearly 16 million Americans, or about 6% of the United State’s population, have diabetes. Of these, 5.4 million have gone undiagnosed.
  1. Each year, more than 30,000 diabetics develop kidney failure.
  1. In the United States, diabetes is more common among certain minority groups, including American Indians, Alaskan Natives, African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Asian Americans.
     
  2. Diabetes is a group of diseases characterized by high levels of blood sugar resulting from insufficient production of insulin by the pancreas or defects in insulin action in the body.
  1. Risk factors for diabetes include autoimmune, genetic and environmental factors. Other risk factors include:
  • Older age
  • Impaired glucose tolerance
  • Obesity
  • Physical inactivity
  • Family history of diabetes
  • Prior history of gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy)
  1. Diabetes damages small blood vessels throughout the body, affecting the kidneys, as well as other organs and tissues, including skin, eyes, nerves, muscles, intestines and the heart.
  1. High blood pressure in diabetics may be the most important predictor of who will develop kidney disease. Therefore, the detection and control of high blood pressure are extremely important in diabetics.
  1. The longer a person has diabetes, the greater the risk of developing CKD.
  1. Some of the signs that a diabetic may be developing kidney disease include:
  • Protein in the urine
  • Abnormal blood tests
  • High blood pressure
  • Morning sickness, nausea and vomiting
  • Leg swelling and leg cramps
  • Weakness, pallor and anemia
  • Increased need to urinate
  • Itching
  • Less need for insulin or medicine to control hyperglycemia
  1. A cure for diabetic kidney disease has not yet been found, while treatment involves controlling the disorder. Some of the treatments that may be effective are:
  • Controlling high blood pressure
  • Exercise and weight loss
  • Controlling blood sugar levels
  • Reducing dietary protein intake
  • Avoiding medications that may damage the kidneys 
Login